This past weekend was the opening of one of the most controversial film in Hollywood as of late, The Birth Of A Nation. The film which was written and directed by Nate Parker is a biopic film that focuses on the powerful movement of the slave rebellion which was lead by Nat Turner, a preacher and literate slave. Amongst all of the controversy behind the film with Nate Parker’s past, many fans were not only left with mixed feelings but it affected the opening weekend sales by the film landing at no.6 and only raking in 7.1 million which wasn’t the predicted forecast by the studio. In spite of the bad ranking, one media outlet, that states the film did rank no.1 in certain African America communities was reported by via Deadline according to their source below:

Sources tell Deadline that in several African American neighborhood theaters in Baldwin Hills, New York, Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago and Norfolk, Birth of a Nation was the No. 1 title. In addition, Birth of a Nation overperformed in the south. ‘A’ grade movies typically generate a 3.6x multiple, and with an opening this low, Birth of a Nation will likely land a final domestic tally that’s under $30M. That’s not enough for a movie that carries an estimated P&A between $10M-$20M and an acquisition price of $17.5M.

Although, some fans disregarded the controversy and focused on the reason and thought provoking history lesson,  many left the theater speechless and sadden while becoming  more curious to find out more about the slave rebellion and exactly who Nat Turner was.

While many were fascinated by the story of Nat Turner another aspect of the film that left many of the audience Interested was the cinematography of the film which was created by Elliot Davis . The Birth Of A Nation was visually translated for the audience to feel the raw and vivid pain of each character from their perspective during important times of events,  by keeping the moments of darkness and cold feeling throughout the film to truly understand each scene.

In addition to the promotional tour of the film and learning more about the history behind why Nate Parker sat on this film for 7 years before he decided to create the it, many Q&A Screenings were held before the national opening weekend. One of those screenings partnered with Fox in New York, to host a sold-out screening for their members  in collaboration with Organizations such as the National Action Network (NAN) in Harlem, the Emerging 100 of Houston, the City of Compton, 100 Black Men of Los Angeles, the Jamaica Center for Learning & Arts (JCAL) in Queens, NY, and the T.R.E. Foundation in Charlotte each . Here are some pictures below!

 

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Photo credit: Bernard Smalls (Harlem), Tylik Hill (Queens), Malik Williams (Charlotte), Andre Kelly (Houston), Julia Lofstrand (LA)

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Photo credit: Bernard Smalls (Harlem), Tylik Hill (Queens), Malik Williams (Charlotte), Andre Kelly (Houston), Julia Lofstrand (LA)

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Photo credit: Bernard Smalls (Harlem), Tylik Hill (Queens), Malik Williams (Charlotte), Andre Kelly (Houston), Julia Lofstrand (LA)

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Photo credit: Bernard Smalls (Harlem), Tylik Hill (Queens), Malik Williams (Charlotte), Andre Kelly (Houston), Julia Lofstrand (LA)

If you are in the mood to check out the latest film and a hard core movie goer, then this film is definitely one to check out in your local theaters.

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